Amenity Migration, Aging, and the Environment

By Bethany Keough and Merinda Edwards.

Published by Spaces and Flows: An International Journal of Urban and ExtraUrban Studies

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Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: March 3, 2016 Free Download

Amenity migration describes the move to new locations due to natural and cultural factors of appeal. In post-industrial times, rural restructuring has occurred with implications for rural land use, as well as ownership and governance. This process has been driven and has been shaped by amenity migration. The implications of amenity migration are vast and interconnected, comprising environmental degradation, social change, social polarisation, shifting economies, demand on infrastructure, and housing affordability. This article seeks to consider the implications of amenity migration in the Australian context with a particular focus towards balancing the relationship between social and environmental shifts in rural coastal communities. The conceptualization and ideals that frame the Australian amenity migration rhetoric are discussed and some analysis of coastal environmental degradation and the community profiles of rural coastal communities are presented. These issues are then deliberated in conjunction with issues facing the ageing population, particularly in rural Australia. The implications for rural townships that are already characterised by older population cohorts, but further amplified by retiree amenity migration, will be considered. The article concludes by presenting recommendations for achieving collaboration in decision making in such communities to ensure that future attempts to address these implications are made cohesively.

Keywords: Coastal Communities, Amenity Migration, Rural Aging

Spaces and Flows: An International Journal of Urban and ExtraUrban Studies, Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2016, pp.1-9. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: March 3, 2016 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 631.499KB)).

Bethany Keough

Ph.D Researcher, School of Natural and Built Environments, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

Merinda Edwards

Ph.D Researcher, School Of Natural and Built Environments, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia