Changing Urban Structure: The Dilemmas and Conflicts of Land and Housing in Urban India

By Sheuli Mitra and Tapas Mitra.

Published by Spaces and Flows: An International Journal of Urban and ExtraUrban Studies

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: September 26, 2014 $US5.00

Urban India had a total housing requirement of 26.53 million units in 2012, as estimated by government sources. Ninety-nine percent of this housing is occupied by the lower income groups of population. Government sources also estimate that the total number of houses constructed from 2002-2012 was 14.34 million. The housing gap is appalling. Providing a basic need—shelter—to an inordinately large segment of urban population unable to afford housing is perhaps the biggest challenge of Indian cities. This research investigates the reasons for conflict between social sustenance and economic viability of urban housing projects, which cumulatively shape the urban structure and growth patterns of the city. Taking the case of Kolkata metropolitan area, the following research uses tools of GIS mapping and satellite imagery interpretation to track the extent of urban housing and township development in the city’s peripheries over the last few decades. The impact of differing economic perspectives on land markets from the government and the private sectors, in addition to the resulting housing and township development, is analysed as a major determinant of the emerging urban pattern at the metropolitan fringes.

Keywords: Urban Land Markets, Urban Housing Dynamics, City Form and Structure

Spaces and Flows: An International Journal of Urban and ExtraUrban Studies, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp.1-13. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: September 26, 2014 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 1.240MB)).

Sheuli Mitra

Associate Professor, Planning, School of Planning and Architecture, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

Tapas Mitra

Associate Professor, Architecture, School of Planning and Architecture, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India